Twelfth Night Dvd Helena Bonham Carter



8
/x

The height of autumnal wistfulness.

Reading Trevor Nunn’southward thoughts on his moving-picture show, information technology is like shooting fish in a barrel to conclude that they were lucky to obtain such sublime weather for the large duration of the filming, in November. The Cornwall locations are admittedly enchanting; showing an England so far from the urban norm these days. The cute natural light, with later dark contrasts, perfectly complements the jovial, winning mood of this Shakespeare comedy brought to screen: and, what is more, this is truly across whatsoever sense of ‘heritage picture palace’, as Shakespeare’south genius is retained.

Yes, it is all a very ‘accessible’ package, only much is unusual and distinctive to this film adaptation. Ben Kinglsey is perhaps the nearly glaring instance of a radical re-invisioning; his acting – stripped bare of bamboozlement – is utterly compelling and keeps yous watching his every mannerism. This Feste is an eccentric, multi-talented clown and performer, merely he also bears words of cutting, melancholy truth. Indeed, both are wonderfully combined with the gorgeously deplorable scene of Staunton, Grant and Smith listening to his sad vocal: they mind and the words cut into their veneers. Loneliness is at their very core. What a brilliantly rounded comedy this is; counterbalanced by melancholy – the inch-perfect awry annotation struck by Hawthorne’s Malvolio appearing at the cease – and good will – the comradely bonhomie that Grant and Smith are indeed shown to share.

Hawthorne and possibly more than surprisingly Mel Smith and Richard E. Grant really do a fine job and imbuing some real character in their parts; treading a line between broad comedic playing and human sadness. Along with Kingsley’s career-best (? non seen likewise many of his films) functioning, they lend this film its middle, and play very well against the wonderful settings. Mackintosh and Stubbs are I guess a little less compelling, but these roles are really difficult to carry off… nada nigh them really lingers also long in the memory, like Kingsley’s expressions, bizarre piddling pieces of trip the light fantastic toe and his pared-down delivery. Helena Bonham Carter is perhaps overly bodacious as the vain countess dame, Olivia: oh so archly bemused when faced by the cross-gartered, prancing Hawthorne, but by and large Ms. Bonham Carter is very much in her usual, predictably petulant, menses-costume mode. Which is probably being unfair; she does convince, at the end of the day.

Overall so, a wonderfully colourful please, bearing the flavour of bright, melancholy late summer-into-autumn. A strange chill is cast by the compelling Kinglsey; a sadness that cannot be dispelled. This film has light amusement in addition to this real border, and is ultimately a very affecting rendering of a bona fide Shakesperean classic.

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7
/10

A beautiful accommodation

Trevor Nunn’s beautifully photographed and acted, deftly written movie is one of the most enjoyable adaptations of a Shakespeare play always made. Helena Bonham Carter is pitch perfect every bit the cute Olivia, who in “deep mourning” for her dead brother, falls in beloved with Cesario (who happens to be a woman named Viola dressed up as a man, wonderfully played by Imogen Stubbs, the merely extra I’ve ever seen able to create both a charming Viola and a totally believable Cesario), meanwhile Viola falls for the Duke of fictional Illyria (the exquisite Toby Stephens) who is desperately in dearest with the Lady Olivia. Meanwhile, Viola’due south lost twin brother (Steven Mackintosh of “Gentlemen Don’t Eat Poets”, first-class over again here) winds upwardly in Illyria and adds to the confusion. Wonderful, layered support comes from Ben Kingsley playing Feste, Olivia’s fool. The only flaw, perhaps, is the few minutes earlier the determination when everything seems to exist coated with a thick gloss of carbohydrate; the film comes through this unscathed. Trevor Nunn comes through with an exquisite Shakespeare motion picture adaptation (which is a do or die task). A swell showcase for the heavenly bandage featuring some of the best performances ever by Bonham Carter (save “Wings of the Dove”), Kingsley (in his best supporting turn ever), novice Stubbs, and Stephens. A very worthwhile effort. Rent information technology, y’all won’t be let downward.

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10
/ten

One of the best interpretations of Shakespeare

In Illyria, Orsino (Toby Stephens), a nobleman, is saddened because he cannot take the love of Lady Olivia (Helena Bonham-Carter) who is mourning the loss of her brother. Meanwhile, twins Sebastian (Stephen Mackintosh) and Viola (Imogen Stubbs) both survive a terrible shipwreck off the coast, but each thinks the other has died. Viola takes the guise of a man and goes to work in the household of the nobleman, falling in love with Duke Orsino. Meanwhile Olivia is taken with Viola who calls herself Cesario. This is the premise of one of William Shakespeare’south near appealing comedies, Twelfth Nighttime: Or What Yous Will, updated from Elizabethan England to late 19th century and brought to life by manager Trevor Nunn. It is one of the best interpretations of Shakespeare that I have seen on flick.

Reminiscent of other Shakespearean cross-dressing comedies such equally As You Like It, Twelfth Dark is mostly about the ins and outs of romantic love but it is also about pride, “overweening ambition”, disguises, and mistaken identities. The play contains some of Shakespeare’s virtually memorable characters: Sir Toby Belch (Mel Smith), Olivia’south drunken uncle, his friend Sir Andrew Aguecheek (Richard East. Grant) who is likewise trying to court Olivia, Olivia’south gentlewoman Maria (Imelda Staunton), Feste (Ben Kingsley), the house clown, and Malvolio (Nigel Hawthorne) the prudish steward. Nunn has assembled a cast that more does justice to the play. Imogen Stubbs equally Viola really looks like a handsome immature man and has a sense of purity and innocence that makes her instantly likable. Helena Bonham Carter brings warmth to the grapheme of Olivia who like Orsino seems to be in love with the thought of beloved not the reality. Some have noticed a similarity between the character of Olivia and Queen Elizabeth and interestingly, Olivia is addressed by Feste every bit “madonna”, the merely time the word is used in all of Shakespeare, perhaps a wry comment about the myth of the Virgin Queen.

The principal story involves a honey triangle between Orsinio, Viola, and Olivia but the minor characters take more than ample time on stage. Malvolio is both a comic and a tragic figure, said to extravaganza Sir Christopher Hatton, a courtier, romantic pursuer of the Queen and rival of the Earl of Oxford. Hatton was and then fawning Elizabeth chosen him her “sheep” or “mutton” and this allusion is present early in the play as Malvolio is chosen a “rascally sheep-biter”, harking back to Hatton’s letter of the alphabet assuring Elizabeth that “The sheep hath no tooth to bite while the Boar’south (Oxford) tusk doth raze and tear.” Malvolio is a puritan who rail against people having fun, a trait that earns him the enmity of Sir Toby and Maria. To strike dorsum, Maria engineers a joke on Malvolio. She forges a honey letter supposedly from Olivia telling him that if he wants her to notice him, he should dress in yellow stockings and crossed garters and, as he woos Olivia dressed in his strange attire, Malvolio cuts a ridiculous figure (incidentally this is the aforementioned costume worn by Henry VIII when he danced with Anne Boleyn, Queen Elizabeth’s female parent, at a masked ball, before he had her beheaded for infidelity).

While at that place are many great performances, the star for me is Ben Kingsley who is totally convincing as Feste, a fool but a knowing one who functions as an objective commentator of the scene around him, exuding an air of righteous superiority. His portrayal of the priest Sir Topas who interrogates Malvolio in a darkened room has overtones of the 1581 trial and execution of Edmund Campion, a Jesuit priest who was executed by the English government in 1581. In his oral communication of less than fifty words, which appears to resemble zilch but nonsense, there are no less than five phrases which refer directly to Edmund Campion and his 1580-81 mission to England.

Richard Desper has pointed out that the mock trial scene works every bit a parody of the government persecution of Catholic martyrs. “The playwright,” he writes, “demonstrates for united states a world turned upside down, with clowns passing themselves off as men of learning, while men of learning …are pressed to deny what they believe to be true to serve political ends.” The ending is too delightful to give annihilation abroad merely it reminded me of the Ingmar Bergman comedy Smiles of a Summer Night, where mismatched couples become together at a summer cottage to sort everything out. Malvolio is pitiable in trying to redeem a shred of dignity but we experience for him when he exits saying, “I shall be revenged on the whole pack of you”. As he leaves, he is the merely person suffering in a sea of happy faces, those on screen as well as those at domicile.

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nine
/10

The best

This is, quite simply, the best production of a Shakespeare comedy ever filmed. The plot is delightfully absurd, the acting brilliant, the direction superb. It is the sort of comedy you tin can picket over and once more.

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7
/10

Entertaining Film

Slick Shakespeare accommodation, well acted and very humorous (in parts) in its telling. Naturally, there’south always going to exist some differences from phase to cinema. The film took advantage of this, of course, to avoid a “stage” feel. The perceptions, or rather the misperceptions, of people and motivations are well explored and portrayed. Ben Kingsley is a standout, for his interesting twist on the character Feste. In short, a skilful adaptation and film. Recommended.

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ix
/10

New Insights into a Groovy Play

At one fourth dimension adaptors of Shakespeare for the cinema trended to concentrate more on his tragedies and history plays rather than his comedies. The 1990s, withal, saw 2 very fine adaptations of Shakespearean comedies, Kenneth Branagh’s “Much Ado about Zilch” and Trevor Nunn’southward “12th Night”.

“12th Night” is another name for the Feast of the Epiphany, January 6th, and the action of the play is supposed to accept place around that date. Nunn, however, did not shoot this film in winter but in fall; filming actually took place in Nov, just the crew were mostly lucky with the weather and the look of the countryside might suggest tardily September or early on October. Although the setting is still officially “Illyria”, an onetime proper name for Republic of croatia, Nunn effectively updates the activeness to Victorian England. The movie was shot on location in Cornwall, with St Michael’s Mount continuing in for Orsino’southward palace and Lanhydrock for Olivia’s mansion.

Dissimilar his gimmicky Marlowe in “Edward II”, Shakespeare never dealt straight with the subject of homosexuality, but “Twelfth Dark” is perhaps the play in which he came closest to dealing with information technology by implication. The plot revolves around a curious love-triangle, A loves B, who loves C, who loves A. Orsino, Duke of Illyria, is in love with the beautiful countess Olivia. She, all the same, has no interest in Orsino, simply has fallen for “Cesario”, the handsome swain whom Orsino uses every bit his go-between. Unknown to both Orsino and Olivia, however, the supposed “Cesario” is really a bearded woman, Viola- who has fallen in love with her employer. An actress complication- and a possible solution to the problem- arises when Viola’s identical twin brother Sebastian, whom she previously believed to exist dead, arrives on the scene. (Yeah, I know that in reality y’all cannot have identical contrary-sex twins, but Shakespearean comedies are not noted for their strict realism).

The lesbian overtones to the Olivia/Viola relationship would probably have been rather muted in Shakespeare’s twenty-four hours when all female roles would have been played by boys, but hither Helena Bonham-Carter and Imogen Stubbs (the manager’due south wife) make the most of them. Fifty-fifty with the assistance of a quasi-military uniform and a imitation moustache, the lovely Imogen never looks particularly masculine, and so there is an implication that Olivia has fallen for someone she consciously believes to be male simply subconsciously knows to be female person. The gay overtones to the relationship between Toby Stephens’ Orsino and “Cesario”, and to that between Sebastian and Antonio, the sea-captain who has befriended him, are perhaps even stronger. Certainly, Orsino’s conversations with “Cesario” seem remarkably intimate if he really does believe his young companion to exist male.

Along with the likes of “Much Ado…” and “Equally Yous Like It”, “Twelfth Night” is sometimes described as a “joyous” comedy in contradistinction to more “problematic” comedies like “Measure for Mensurate” and “All’southward Well that Ends Well”. It does, yet, have its darker side; several characters, for example, accept recently suffered bereavement, or believe themselves to have done so, and this production tends to stress the darkness underlying the play. The autumnal setting contributes to this feeling, as does the fact that most of the characters are seen dressed in black.

The night overtones are particularly pronounced in the sub-plot involving Olivia’south steward, Malvolio. He is sometimes played simply as a narrow- minded Puritan and his adversary Sir Toby equally a jovial, lovable quondam man whose only concern is to have his “cakes and ale”. For Nunn, nonetheless, matters are not so uncomplicated. Nigel Hawthorne’s Malvolio- the ane character for whom there is no happy catastrophe- is an essentially tragic figure, a dignified and defended servant who is tricked into making a fool of himself past a gang of people who have taken an irrational dislike to him. His proper noun is derived from the Italian for “sick will”, however its significance here may be that Malvolio is not so much the perpetrator of malice equally the victim of the malice of others.

There is an fantabulous operation from Mel Smith, better known as a television comedian, as Sir Toby. Smith brings out both the nastiness and the sadness which lie at the center of his character. Sir Toby is a human of wealth and noble family (he is Olivia’south uncle) who has spent his whole life in feasting, drinking and womanising and who has a fondness for cruel applied jokes; too his tricking of Malvolio he dupes his friend Andrew Aguecheek and “Cesario” into fighting a duel. (Both acquit themselves surprisingly well, given that ane is really a woman and the other an arrant coward). Yet there is besides an implied sadness about Smith’s characterisation; Toby knows that his life has been a wasted one, but feels that information technology is too late to better.

Too Hawthorne and Smith there are too many adept contributions to single them all out individually. I must, however, mention Stubbs, who is able to advise both a male persona and the underlying woman, and Ben Kingsley as Olivia’s jester Feste, whom he plays less as a clown than every bit a sardonic old philosopher, an eccentric but as well a homo gifted with penetrating insights into human being life.

“Twelfth Night” is one of Shakespeare’southward best-known comedies, and similar all well-known Shakespeare plays it has get very familiar in the theatre. A good director, however, whether in the theatre or on screen, volition e’er be able to observe something new to say well-nigh it, and that is what Nunn has done here. He and his cast take found new insights into this nifty play, enabling u.s.a. to see information technology with new optics. An excellent production. ix/10

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nine
/ten

Excellent

Reading other reviews of ‘Twelfth Night’ it is interesting to see that some people think information technology is a slow picture show and others quite fast. It gripped me from the opening gust of pelting on a nighttime dark to Feste dancing off into the sunset. Grappling with Shakespeare is a perilous activity simply I thought Trevor Nunn brought out the one-act and the emotions of the story well. It is a film to make you smiling at the follies of flesh merely besides their amuse.

Ben Kingsley is amazing. I’ve never seen Feste played that way but it seemed perfect. Imogen Stubbs does the comedy and the drama equally well. The scene with Orsino in the bathtub is a stock one but she does information technology beautifully, balancing the sense of humour of the state of affairs with the tenderness and the longing. Imelda Staunton brings unusual depth to the character of Maria. The residuum of the cast are great too.

The text of the play is inverse around but not unnaturally so. The scene that cuts between Feste’s vocal and Viola/Cesario and Orsino playing cards is wonderful, taking in 8 of the characters and telling yous more than about them. The last act of the play is difficult to stage well just Nunn gives it a adept shot.

The Cornwall setting is lovely, the radiant sunshine, the green leaves and fine buildings are captured gorgeously by the cameras. I also liked the music very much and discover some of the tunes quite hummable.

Very enjoyable and worth seeing over again and over again.

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10
/10

Simply the Best

Alarm: Spoilers

I was introduced to this delight in the 10th grade during Earth History every bit an implementation of my teacher’s favorite instructing method- stick in a motion-picture show and assign an outline. Dark room, people whispering or making out in the corner, deadening motion picture: this class was normally known as Nap Time, simply non that day. In went the tape and out came a story full of vivacity, charm, hilarity and heart.

The story is of a girl, Viola, who loses her brother and disguises herself as him to find piece of work. She falls in love with the Duke, who has sent her to woo a countess by the name of Olivia, who has lost her blood brother too. Of course, Olivia falls in love with Viola, thinking she is a swain. Viola now must reject one love because she is a woman and be rejected by another love that believes she is a man. What to do? Throw more people into the mix! Olivia, being a countess and therefore rich as anything, has no lack of other admirers from the insanely stupid Sir Andrew Aguecheeck that her uncle encourages for sport to her pious steward, Malvolio. Each person vies for her attentions while she goes insane over the one “homo” she cannot have. Enter Sebastian, Viola’s twin blood brother who *gasp* didn’t die after all. Much confusion and laughter later, Viola is finally able to shed her “masculine usurped attire” and profess her dear for the now-frazzled Duke. Don’t worry about Olivia, she gets to keep a re-create, the e’er-willing Sebastian.

Watching this movie the first fourth dimension, I could hardly believe information technology was written 400 years ago. The story relates flawlessly to a modern audience. Watching it for the hundredth time afterward I bought it, I am still captivated past the genius adaption. The script is so funny and intertwines plot lines seamlessly. The actors actually know what they are trying to say, which is half of conveying the meaning of the “hard” linguistic communication. Even if I did not understand every give-and-take, I would become the meaning with help from the incredible acting.

Imogene Stubbs is cute every bit Viola- she really makes a very cute, albeit effeminate “boy.” I felt the almost for her, especially when she tells the Duke the story of her love for him under the guise of a “sis.”

Toby Stephens every bit the Knuckles was quite handsome, and made the character more likable. If information technology had been another person, I would have wondered what in the world Viola saw in the whiny, fanciful homo, but he was quite suave and charming.

Olivia-Bonham-Carter shone every bit the almost bi-polar Olivia. She snapped from the pit of despair to the heights of dear inside a scene, but invited you lot to express joy with her in giddiness rather than snort in disbelief.

Ben Kingsly was perfection equally Feste, probably the best performance of the movie. He was a fool, but he knew it. He gave a performance of simple farce with a current of swell insight underneath.

The others, Mel Smith, Imelda Staunton, Nigel Hawthorne, Richard Grant, Steven Mackintosh and Nicholas Farrell all provided excellent comedic support, tinged with the faintest hint of melancholy that brought just the correct mix.

Whether you’re a fan of Shakespeare or not, Twelfth Night is without a doubt an astonishing experience. Information technology brings laughter, excitement and maybe even a misty eye with each viewing. Go rent information technology if you haven’t seen it and if you have, pull it out and treat yourself tonight. I know I will.

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eight
/10

A more than worthy Twelfth Night

I accept been reading and loving Shakespeare since year 6 of chief school. At first I didn’t understand the language, only the many discussions we had about it while reading aloud improved my understanding and didn’t waver my interest. 12th Nighttime mayn’t have the most plausible story of all the Shakespeare plays, merely information technology is still a lot of fun.

This Twelfth Night is more than than worthy. It is not thr best Shakespeare film, not like Othello, Henry 5, Much Ado About Zilch and Hamlet, but information technology does boast a strong bandage and impeccable production values.

If I had any criticisms confronting this Twelfth Night, they would be that as well shot and as interesting as the first scene was, part of me institute it unnecessary compared to the residue of the film and it didn’t add much to the storytelling, and as well information technology did feel a little sugar-coated towards the terminate.

Criticisms aside, this is a very cute-looking Twelfth Night, with the luscious photography, autumnal imagery and scenery and colourful, sumptuous costumes. The music is full of memorable tunes that likewise practice well to enhance each scene.

Trevor Nunn’southward direction is fantabulous, the dialogue is intelligently woven and delivered, the story while condensed even so maintains the play’southward fun and spirit, all the relationships are intact and done assuredly and the pace is smart and snappy.

The acting is just smashing. Toby Stephens deserves credit for breathing life to Orsino, when he could easily have been bland and Imogen Stubbs is radiant. In the more comic roles, Malvolio, Sir Andrew and particularly Sir Toby are hoots, and Imelda Staunton is a memorable Maria. My favourites here are Helena Bonham Carter and Ben Kingsley every bit Olivia and Feste, Carter is notation perfect and Kingsley gives maybe his best e’er back up plough.

All in all, a lot of fun and very worthy. eight/ten Bethany Cox

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Mostly an enjoyable and accessible adaptation

Viola and Sebastian are siblings who expect quite akin and are very close due to being simply alone together since the death of their father. They are entertaining on lath a ship when a tempest sees Viola lost overboard, with Sebastian diving in after her. Separated and each fearing the other lost to the seas, Viola disguises herself as a human being, Cesario and wins the confidence and friendship of Duke Orsino, who seeks Viola’south help in wooing Lady Olivia. Olivia is wearing the decease of her blood brother like a constant veil to avoid Orsino as she does not love him – still she quickly finds love for her new visitor “Cesario”. If that wasn’t bad plenty, Olivia’southward cousin Toby Belch conspires to complicate things further by convincing both the unproblematic Sir Andrew Aguecheek and the pompous servant Malvolio that they are both desired by Olivia. Meanwhile, local man Feste looks on at the madness around him.

I exercise enjoy Shakespeare and relish nothing more than the occasional evening downward the route in the theatres off the river in Stratford-upon-Avon watching the RSC. Yet, before anyone thinks I am presenting myself every bit some grade of intellectual, I easily struggle to follow the narrative within the linguistic communication and will often make sure I know the plot before I offset the film so that I tin can get lost in the catamenia of the dialogue, miss the meaning of some sections only all the same follow the overall menses. The “best” productions I accept seen on stage and film are presented in such a way to make them accessible to the target audience. With this version of Twelfth Night, I did find some parts of the first half of the moving-picture show a petty hard to become into but equally the characters and various threads get developed a flake more.

At the showtime the aspects of farce and slight melancholy don’t totally work but every bit it went on and I got into it, I found that it worked better and ameliorate. It is worth saying this because some viewers who struggle at first and possibly are not familiar with the story may bail inside xx minutes, however to practise so, in my opinion, would be a error. Nunn’s direction is by and large good only the one big problem I did accept with the delivery was the sound quality. The dialogue is hard to follow every bit it is but in some scenes the large rooms produce an echo event that makes it slightly hard to hear..

This is not down to the actors though and indeed if the film has ane overriding strength it is the performances, which are roundly engaging and fun. Stubbs leads the bandage well but, if you excuse the irony, she has a rather straight role in comparing to majority of the remainder. Bonham-Carter is really well bandage and does practiced piece of work in the object of affection. Stephens is solid, as are Mackintosh, Livingstone and Farrell. Smith and Staunton are fun and they work well with the enjoyable pompous Hawthorne. Similarly Grant gives proficient moron and Kingsley does adept work as Feste, making a stiff core outside of the thread to some degree.

Overall so an enjoyable and engaging version of the Shakespeare. Viewers may discover information technology a bit difficult going in the early stages but, aside from the sound issues, information technology gets increasingly accessible and enjoyable and is a very proficient adaptation.

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six
/x

Cute, Well Bandage, A Swollen, Ponderous Dud……

In one of the DVD extras, a producer praises director Trevor Nunn equally knowing more than most Shakespeare than whatever human being in England. (Not true, it’s John Barton. Just that’s another story.)

Unfortunately, Nunn attempts to demonstrate his erudition in this beautifully photographed, somewhat medicinal misfire. In an effort to serve upwards Shakespeare to anybody, he’s bogged himself downwardly in self-conscious paralysis. Despite the beautiful images and the star-studded cast, this is an airless, spineless lump.

Imogen Stubbs (Mrs. Nunn) is quite fine as Viola, and Richard East. Grant maintains not bad energy as Sir Andrew Aguecheek. Just nearly everybody else is sabotaged by a leaden stride and a heavy directorial hand. Nigel Hawthorne’s Malvolio is destroyed by the glacial tempo, and Helena Bonham Carter’s amuse wilts at half speed.

Mel Smith is beautifully bandage as Sir Toby Belch, simply is besides just too darn slow. In a major miscalculation, Ben Kingsley’s plays Feste every bit a menacing ex-con, perhaps Abel Magwitch strayed in from “Great Expectations.” This is a Killer Klown from Kornwall.

And in order to keep things this sluggish, at to the lowest degree a tertiary of the text of the play is missing. It’south the linguistic communication that makes Shakespeare immortal, not the plots. Bad idea….

Oddly plenty, in grouping scenes, actors often lose character, just continuing around staring blankly at whoever is talking. You lot never see this in films, and yous shouldn’t. It should never happen.

There is a 1969 ITV version circulating with Sir Alec Guinness as Malvolio and Sir Ralph Richardson as Sir Toby Discharge to remind u.s.a. of how far we haven’t come up.

But all-time of all is the 1980 BBC DVD with Felicity Kendall, Sinead Cusack, Alec McCowen, Robert Hardy and Robert Lindsay. That “12th Nighttime” is an ensemble delight from beginning to end, with a full text and almost flawless in engaging the play successfully on every level at one time. Run, don’t walk. It’south a 18-carat treat.

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Sparkling comedy transformed into a ponderous bore

In writing Twelfth Night (and the aforementioned goes for many other of his romantic comedies), Shakespeare showed that he was non simply a genius at dark tragedy only also at low-cal comedy. I saw a inferior college production of this play which did live up to Shakespeare’south intentions, which was in fact so funny I was falling off my chair.

Unfortunately, director Nunn will not allow a hilarious slapstick one-act to just be a hilarious slapstick comedy. Manifestly he succumbed to the notion that everything Shakespearean has somehow to seem profound, which in this example results in an endeavor to transfer this light, sparkling one-act, full of deliberately overdrawn characters and airheaded lines and pratfalls, into a heart-searching tragedy in which pompous donkey Malvolio acts as if he were, or imagined himself to be, Hamlet caught in the wrong play, while clown Feste is misanthropic to the indicate of sadism. There is no suggestion of comic timing anywhere in this film!

Information technology appears that once Nunn decided to insist on a mod-wearing apparel version, he adopted equally his mentor the permit’s-portray-the-messed-upward-dysfunctional-household schoolhouse. This is stupid. A improve mentor would have been a closer modern equivalent of what Shakespeare was doing in this play. Something similar I Love Lucy or Amos ‘n’ Andy or The Honeymooners, in other words.

I thing that entirely puzzles me is: why the devil didn’t Nunn exploit the particular advantages of the movie theatre in depicting this gender-bender story of a daughter impersonating a look-alike boy? Why in sam colina didn’t Nunn have a male actor who is skilled at female impersonation, or an actress skilled at impersonating males, play both roles on a split screen? (Run into, for the sort of impersonation I refer to, Vanessa Redgrave equally the trans-sexual tennis player in Second Serve.) In other words: Why transform a phase play into a motion picture at all, if you’re not going to put the advantages of the cinema, every bit opposed to those of the stage, to work? Nunn’s handling of this play is not merely a mangled interpretation, it’due south unimaginative.

Ben Kingsley is the just performer who does very much with his office, and what he does he does very well. His acting creates a very interesting grapheme, and his interpretation of Feste is certainly consistent, but it receives no support whatsoever from the text.

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Good looking & well acted effort at an implausible Shakespearian plot

As with virtually Shakespearian comedies, the plot is securely implausible. Even so, the excellent Cornish locations at St Michael’s Mountain & Lanhyrock requite a good sense of identify and the winter setting (apart from the scene of apple picking!) comes beyond well – information technology really does wait similar an English winter, rather than a picture postcard snow-scene.

The play is cut down to a manageable length without losing the sense of it, The broad comedy aspects (Toby Belch et al) are thankfully limited.

The acting is well done past a bandage of British stalwarts. Amazingly, Viola and Sebastian actually do look broadly alike.

This motion-picture show is best viewed equally an agreeable lite romantic comedy rather than a side-splitter.

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5
/10

Why was this story transposed to a totally inappropriate era?

It may be that since I take become older my hearing has deteriorated, or that my Tv ready needs replacing, or that the cablevision signal hither is beneath par; but, for many dramatic works on TV, I now consistently find difficulty in post-obit the dialogue. When this happens I usually attribute it to poor diction past the cast members. This would be very difficult to do in the case of Twelfth Dark which has a uniformly excellent cast. However my experience is that this problem is always exacerbated during the performance of whatsoever classic work which has been significantly transposed in either space of fourth dimension, and I therefore do not generally enthuse about productions featuring Shakespearean plays as contemporary works. This moving picture of Twelfth Night is actually set in the nineteenth century, and is also geographically transposed from Illyria to what is clearly Cornwall. Unfortunately I personally found this to exist even more than confusing than a completely contemporary performance. With Shakespeare in modern apparel, one must accept the cast travelling by auto or plane and using modern electronic equipment, but here we have a catamenia piece where the sixteenth century dialogue is spoken by actors in nineteenth century attire and interspersed past the playing of modern musical instruments and games, the use of period firearms, the riding of bicycles, and travel past stagecoach. For me such changes created great incongruities which destroyed the illusion of reality that all dramatic works accept to try to create, and thus made the plot even more difficult to follow. So I am sorry only I cannot share the enthusiasm of many other viewers whose comments are recorded here.

That said, I must acknowledge that the performances are outstanding and the play flows in a manner which many more traditional versions practise not. Twelfth Nighttime is one of Shakespeare’due south finest plays, with many complex characters who tin constantly surprise the audience without in any manner derailing the ongoing comedy, and this makes the play a joy to scout. Unfortunately only too often this comedy is reduced to about slapstick, which completely hides the depth Shakespeare wrote into near of the characters he created. Nunn’south presentation is one of the best I have seen for gradually revealing these unexpected facets of grapheme equally his (greatly shortened) play develops. The longer I watched information technology the more at dwelling I felt, and the nearer I came to at last being drawn into the operation. I can readily sympathize that those who exercise not share the reservations I have expressed to a higher place would be likely to rate this moving picture very highly. In particular the performances of Ben Kingsley as Feste and of Helen Bonham Carter as Olivia are of award winning quality. The photography is also delightful, and the film shows none of the blips in continuity that and so often have place when a heavily cutting play by Shakespeare is filmed. Overall I take rated this flick at five stars; only readers of these comments should recognise that I would have liked to give it a college rating if only I had been able to forget occasionally that I was watching actors playing rather strange and hybrid parts.

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4
/10

A solid accommodation

Although not the ‘modern’ version it in one case was this is notwithstanding a good enough pic version of Shakespeare’s immortal comedy of misunderstandings and dearest triangles galore.

As with whatever literary adaptation there are certain interpretations of characters/actors playing them that you prefer, and this version is no dissimilar. I liked Helena Bonham Carter’due south portrayal, I didn’t like Ben Kingsley’s, it’s swings and roundabouts.

This is yet a decent plenty adaptation that remains faithful to the original text to satisfy fans, while also filmic enough to entertain those who oasis’t read the play.

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6
/10

Great cast headlining a Shakespeare rom com

I’m no big fan of Shakespeare’s comedies, much preferring his darker fare like the tragedies, but Twelfth Nighttime is a riotous movie brought ably to life by theatre director Trevor Nunn. He assembles a cast of seasoned professionals who plough the material into something special, despite the lengthy running fourth dimension. Shakespeare’south story of mistaken identity and the attempts of numerous suitors attempting to woo a countess is certainly a fast-paced and cluttered matter.

Helena Bonham Carter headlines the cast in a decent early part, and she’south supported past the likes of Nigel Hawthorne, Toby Stephens, and Nicholas Farrell. The most fun comes from the likes of Richard E. Grant and Mel Smith playing ridiculously slapstick characters, although the scene-stealer here is Ben Kingsley as the fool. The production is colourful and vibrant, and my simply complaint is the 19th century setting, which sits at odds with the source fabric. I’ve never really got the need to contemporise classic works like this.

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nine
/10

A lovely adaptation

Trevor Nunn’s adaptation of Twelfth Night is exceptionally beautiful, well acted, and emotionally engaging. Ben Kingsley’due south functioning as the Fool stands out as magnificent, simply the entire ensemble comes off very well. The film nails both the joy and the darkness of Shakespeare’due south play – and the play, make no mistake, contains enough of dark and foreign moments when things go, as the drunken uncle Sir Toby Discharge says, “Out of tune, sir.” The filmmakers deserve credit for not glossing over the shades of sadism in Toby’s handling of Malvolio or the shallow fickleness of Orsino’due south character. The wintry Cornwall setting dovetails perfectly with the mood of the play, half sunday and half shadow, and the costume blueprint (roughly Edwardian, though I am not an skilful on fashion history) creatively evokes the luxury of Orsino and Olivia’southward courtly world, while allowing for – fifty-fifty necessitating – the brilliant re-imagining of the Fool as bohemian vagabond.

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7
/ten

Lively

A lively, bubbly product of ane of Shakespeare’s more hard plays. Information technology’s difficult to know just what Shakespeare was getting at with this story. The text doesn’t always seem to make sense. That’southward reflected in this, as well as any other, product. At times, one wonders what the expressions on characters’ faces are meant to indicate. Just after Feste has fooled Malvolio with his imitation of the curate, for instance, Maria has a perturbed look on her face up. Every bit if the joke that she herself and then elaborately designed now troubles her. At that place’due south nothing in the text to indicate that her expression should show remorse; and yet Sir Toby soon after says that he’s sick of the whole thing. Why? That’s one example of the difficulty of the text (which may accept been corrupted over the centuries), and how information technology is manifested in this item production’s choices. I don’t know why Sir Toby remarks at this indicate that he’s sick of the joke, nor exercise I know whether Maria should share his feelings.

Another difficulty is the part of Feste. Ben Kingsley fills this role, and because Ben Kingsley is a major star, he magnifies this character (in my opinion) out of all proportion. He becomes a sort of Zen master, pompous and oppressive. His jokes aren’t funny (maybe we can’t find Shakespeare’south jokes funny today, but Kingsley’s heavy delivery precludes humor), and his terminal confrontation with Malvolio comes off as a sort of thundering divine retribution. The unabridged play, the entire cast, stops dead and Feste takes over as if the whole point of the play has been his apotheosis at the expense of the degraded Malvolio. This surely cannot be what Shakespeare had in heed. Throughout the play he has a disconcerting habit of staring at other characters or the camera with what almost be described every bit a leer.

Maybe Shakespeare would accept sighed and commiserated with the producer of this film, because the clowns in his day were also large stars who demanded a lot of meat in their roles. The trouble is that there merely isn’t much meat in Feste’south role according to the text, so we’re stuck with leers and thundering retribution and other inventions. Shakespeare had to adapt his clowns with ever-more than important roles, climaxing with characters similar Touchstone and Lear’due south fool. Kingsley is just inventing his own graphic symbol. At times his work is interesting, but his weight in the production is, as I said, oppressive.

Still, his screen time is relatively small-scale, and much of the remainder of the play is a joy, fifty-fifty if the indicate of the story isn’t always clear. Bonham-Carter was never more alluring, Hawthorne is priceless every bit Malvolio (he was born for the role), and Smith and Grant are the perfect combination of Belch and Aguecheek. I suppose you lot might object that all four of them put their eyebrows to such prodigious use that their interim might be characterized equally hamming. Just I don’t run into how whatever of these characters tin can be played directly if the play is to work.

One thing is for certain, no one would e’er accuse this production of bogging down. The pace is lively, the sets and the cinematography are e’er striking, the score is invigorating, and I suspect that I could watch this film dubbed in Swahili and it would still exist a lot of fun. Visually absorbing is perhaps the best description.

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8
/ten

A delightful one-act of gender confusion

Alert: Spoilers

Twins Viola and Sebastian look very like so much then that they enjoy trying to trick people equally to which is which aboard the ship in which they are sailing. After the transport is wrecked information technology appears that Sebastian has died but Viola is amid the survivors. She decides that it would be safest if she were to disguise herself every bit a boy, have the name Cesario and gets a chore serving as a folio to Duke Orsino. She presently starts to develop feelings for her only can’t requite voice to them. Things go a fiddling more bad-mannered for her when Orsino requires her go to the nearby Countess Olivia to tell her of his love. She isn’t interested in him but is rather taken past ‘Cesario’! If that weren’t enough others are trying to persuade Olivia’s steward, the rather bumptious Malvolio, that she has feelings for him. When it emerges that Sebastian is in fact even so live things get fifty-fifty more confused as he looks and is dressed just like ‘Cesario’!

This is the first version of this Shakespeare one-act that I’ve seen so can’t say how it compares to other adaptions. The story is delightfully over the top with confusions. I liked the tardily Victorian/Edwardian setting and fine Cornish locations. The manner the story is adjusted, with brusque scenes and numerous locations, makes information technology feel more cinematic than theatrical.

The cast is impressive; while no viewer is likely to confuse Imogen Stubbs and Steven Mackintosh as ‘Cesario’ and Sebastian they practice look like enough and the quondam, with the assist of shortened hair and a false moustache, does take a slightly adolescent look. The remainder of the cast were impressive besides; notably Helena Bonham Carter every bit Olivia; Nigel Hawthorne as Malvolio; Ben Kingsley as Feste, the fool; Mel Smith as drunken Sir Toby Belch and Richard E. Grant every bit Sir Andrew Aguecheek. The one-act is a trivial featherbrained but that is the joy of it; one might accept though the things that people found funny 4 hundred years ago would raise a express mirth these days just I institute myself laughing out loud several times. Overall I’d certainly recommend this to anybody wanting a skilful romantic comedy even if you con’t consider yourself a fan of Shakespeare.

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6
/x

Shakesperean adaptation

Boilerplate. My assessment for this film is purely in terms of ‘amusement’, okay? And in this regard, without considering others, my grade is simply boilerplate. It is an accommodation of i of William Shakespeare’s works. The functioning is expert and very theatrical with extravagant gestures, caricatures, expressions, language, humor, typical of medieval British theatrical comedies. It’south kind of a comic opera. Recommended for lovers of literary classics adapted to cinematography. I am not particularly a large fan of this blazon of film, but I would non be bothered to watch others of the same kind.

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6
/10

or, What They Won’t

In William Shakespeare’due south “Twelfth Night” (or, “What You Will”), brother and sister twins “Viola” and “Sebastian” are shipwrecked off the shores of “Illyria”. “Viola” mistakenly thinks brother “Sebastian” has drowned. She goes to “Illyria” alone; and, she assumes the identity of a young man, “Cesario”. In “Illyria”, “Cesario” (“Viola”) gets a job as admirer (dresser) for the duke “Orsino”. Male person (female) “Cesario” (“Viola”) falls in love with (male) “Orsino”. Just, he loves some other adult female, “Olivia”. Meanwhile, “Olivia” falls in honey with the female twin “Cesario” (“Viola”), thinking she is a male person. Then, real male person twin “Sebastian” returns, undead!

And so, all’due south well that ends well.

The supporting characters in director Trevor Nunn’south cinematic version are all right (actually, they come off ameliorate, due to the overall execution of the movie). But, mainly, it’due south near Imogen Stubbs (as Viola aka Cesario), and her interaction with Toby Stephens (as Orsino) and Helena Bonham Carter (as Olivia). This “Twelfth Nighttime” is very well produced. It seems much more dramatic than comic, which is most obvious in the tone-setting opening. The supporting characters and subplots retain the more comic flavor, though. This portends a promising adaptation.

Merely, the film doesn’t really end up as you similar information technology.

Ms. Stubbs becomes an endearing “Viola”. Both Stubbs and Mr. Stephens, and Stubbs and Ms. Bonham Carter are fun to watch “fall in love”. The sexual dynamics work; interestingly, each of the performers add some subtleties. Flick, of course, picks up its ain (different than stage) nuances. The already shaky premise falls apart, however, when “Sebastian” returns; and, the performers lose credibility very quickly. Originally, a male would more assuredly play BOTH twins. Information technology would have been better to take Stubbs (or fifty-fifty Steven Mackintosh) play both roles. This motion picture points in the right direction; simply, next time, either become all the way, or exit “Twelfth Dark” on the stage.

****** Twelfth Dark (1996) Trevor Nunn ~ Imogen Stubbs, Toby Stephens, Helena Bonham Carter

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Admittedly Ponderous

I beg to differ from the other User Comments. My family likes Shakespeare and we all agreed that this was one of the WORST adaptations nosotros’ve seen! True the sets and photography were lovely, but the pacing was excruciatingly slow. In my opinion, the underground to a successful product of a Shakespeare comedy, at least for a modern audience, lies in rapid-fire delivery of the lines with a sense of natural language-in-cheek. Otherwise, the audience is given as well much opportunity to realize just how ridiculous and implausible the plot really is. In this production, the lines seem to be dragged out to their ultimate limit, with lots of pauses in between. While I remember that Shakespeare’due south comedies are more difficult to interpret on film than his tragedies, there have been some successes. Kenneth Branagh’s `Much Ado About Nothing’ and Franco Zefferelli’s `Taming of the Shrew’ come up to heed. Even Peter Hoffman’southward recent `A Midsummer Night Dream’, despite some casting mistakes, was better than this. Helena Bonham-Carter’s considerable talents are wasted in the production, equally I suspect are those of the other actors, with whom I am less familiar. None of them seem exist having whatsoever fun. It’s hard to believe that such an experienced Shakespearean director could have missed the mark so desperately. I’ve seen a production by kids anile ix-14 that had a lot more energy than this!

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half dozen
/10

Well Made Motion-picture show

“12th Night” is a very well produced motion-picture show. The cinematography is excellent, featuring nice settings and brilliant colors and shading. The music is as well excellent and advisable. The acting is bang-up as well. Then why am I giving this solid film only a 6/ten rating? Considering I did have trouble hearing all of the dialogue and making out what they were maxim. And unfortunately the DVD did non include closed captions which would have helped greatly. Therefore I requite it a 6/10. I do take mixed feelings towards Shakespeare; on the one hand I exercise like some of his writing, but on the other hand information technology can be difficult to hear and empathize when it’south spoken speedily or softly. I would recommend this film though if you like Shakespeare; it’due south every bit fine a pic accommodation of 1 of his plays equally I’ve seen.

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six
/x

Twelfth Night

Gender fluidity, a love square, and Shakespeare; what more can 1 ask for in a movie? Twelfth Night is an adaptation of Shakespeare’s play of the aforementioned name. This version, directed by Trevor Nunn in 1996 starred Imogen Stubbs, Steven Mackintosh, Ben Kingsley, and Helena Bonham Carter. Exploring such bug equally the uncertainty of gender and the expletive of love, the bard never shied away from a heavy story. Twelfth Dark is a moving-picture show with a beautiful production design accompanying Shakespeare’s well-known prose, making the picture an enjoyable journeying for audiences of all ages.

Washed to shore after a shipwreck, blueblood Viola (Imogen Stubbs) longs to exist reunited with the brother she was separated with at ocean. While attempting to navigate the new land she has been washed upon, Viola is devastated with the assumption that her blood brother has perished at sea. She now finds herself alone and in unfamiliar territory. Without her brother Sebastian(Steven Mackintosh), Viola must observe a style to work and fend for herself. In one case hearing nigh a Lady Olivia (Helena Bonham Carter), who is mourning the loss of her blood brother, Viola feels a kinship and wishes to piece of work in Lady Olivia’s domicile. She learns, withal, that Lady Olivia is not talking to strangers and is in deep mourning over the loss of her brother. Viola then learns that a nobleman, Count Orsino lies around listening to music all twenty-four hour period, hopelessly in dear with Lady Olivia. Viola decides to dress upwardly every bit a man and work in the Count’s dwelling house as a fashion to proceeds proximity to Lady Olivia. Viola’due south life becomes complicated when she falls for Count Orsino, Count Orsino refuses to carelessness his love of Lady Olivia, and Lady Olivia falls for Cesario, the proper name Viola adopted when she began her life as a man. The curse of love plagues all in this Shakespeare classic, and seeing the journeying unfold on-screen is certainly a care for for audiences.

The start hour of this film moves incredibly slow. Having such an interesting plot, and many subplots within, I did not conceptualize pacing being an issue for this picture show, but information technology certainly was. The product design was beautiful and the castles in which Lady Olivia and Count Orsino lived were beautifully done. A period piece such every bit this i depends upon its product blueprint to be able to transform the audience into some other identify and time, and Trevor Nunn obviously knew that quite well. Nunn obviously took painstaking measures to create a realism to his film that cannot exist ignored. Perhaps it was his dedication to realism that dragged on the first half of the movie with endless shots of the sets beingness used. Whatever the issue, the sets were beautiful. The film was comprised of mostly British actors, which is e’er a treat for this film buff. Past in large, British actors bring a sense of regalness to the roles they take, which is especially important when tackling Shakespeare. At that place was also wonderful music sprinkled throughout Twelfth Night. Oftentimes, peculiarly throughout the first hour of the motion picture, the music and acting were the only bright spots moving the film along. Another treat was beingness introduced to Helena Bonham Carter. I had never earlier seen a picture show starring the actress and only knew her as being romantically linked to director Tim Burton, so I was never sure what to expect from her. I was pleasantly surprised by her range on screen. She played the mourning, nonetheless playful sister quite well. Bonham Carter also had no effect playing the love-struck even so difficult to get Lady Olivia. Playing these opposites off each other then well gave me a new respect for the actress.

12th Nighttime goes to great depth to explore the limits of gender. Gender is, without question, the most obvious theme throughout the flick, every bit it explores the sexual defoliation created when Viola dresses up as a man. Meanwhile; while trying to gain access to Lady Olivia for herself, all the while working for Count Orsino in attempts to convince Lady Olivia to honey him, Viola falls in love with Orsino herself. This love must remain a secret because no one knows Viola’southward true identity as a woman. Shakespeare doesn’t practise much to clear upwardly this confusion, even by the play’s close. Count Orsino seems to savour loving Viola while she is still exhibiting masculinity. It is left as a mystery whether or not Orsino loves Viola or her masculine persona. Some other withstanding theme throughout the flick is the burden of love. No one that loves someone is happy in this romantic comedy. Love seems to wage a war within each individual that experiences it on-screen, rather than the happy life-fulfilling emotion we are more than comfortable describing information technology as. Whether the ending leaves you feeling similar dearest conquers all, or love is for the birds, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy is one that has endured.

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eight
/10

A romantic comedy nearly cross-dressing and mistaken identity

This is a svelte, charming, gorgeous-looking version in fairy-tale Edwardian dress, with lots of lovely indoor and outdoor shots. Imogen Stubbs is bonny and feisty as Viola/Cesario, Ben Kingsley delivers a circuitous and intriguing performance as the fool Feste, and Helena Bonham -Carter is a warm, humorous and devastatingly beautiful Olivia. The supporting cast is funny and lively, the schticks all piece of work, and the ornamental garden deserves star billing.

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Source: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0117991/reviews